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OSDH Recognizes National Nurses Day

The Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH) would like to mark National Nurses Day by thanking all the hard-working nurses for their continued dedication during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“We greatly appreciate all that you, as critically important health professionals, do to keep Oklahomans healthy,” said Health Commissioner Gary Cox. “Especially during this pandemic, you provide unwavering care for us at all hours and often behind the scenes. National Nurses Day is a great opportunity to raise awareness of your important role.”

National Nurses Day was established in 1954 to mark the 100th anniversary of Florence Nightingale’s contribution to the field of medicine. Nightingale is often credited as the founder of modern nursing, as she is responsible for many of the standards that are required of present-day nurses, including strict handwashing and hygiene practices.

Today, nursing remains one of the most popular careers in the United States. According to a 2014 study conducted by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, registered nurses made up the largest portion of the healthcare workforce in the United States. In Oklahoma, there are over 56,000 Registered Nurses (RNs), 18,000 Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs) and 3,572 Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs).

The OSDH would like to encourage everyone to show appreciation for the nurses in their lives today, and through the rest of National Nursing Week, which concludes on May 12.

COVID-19 | Oklahoma State Department of Health logo

 

 

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Please click on the link below for local weather - Duncan, Oklahoma

 

https://www.weatherlink.com/embeddablePage/show/cad152b829264baab928134b2df4f184/summary 

 

 

COVID-19 INFORMATION

Monday, 30 March, 2020

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BEFORE AN EMERGENCY STRIKES

Friday, 15 November, 2019

ema suppliesCreate an Emergency Plan

 

Steps to take in creating a household emergency plan include:

 

  • Schedule a family meeting to discuss the dangers of possible emergency events including fire, severe weather, hazardous spills and terrorism.
  • Discuss how you and your family will respond to each possible emergency.
  • Discuss what to do in case of power outages or personal injuries.
  • Draw a floor plan of your home and mark two escape routes from each room.
  • Because it is often easier to call long distance during an emergency than within the affected area, choose an out-of-state friend or relative whom all family members will call if separated during an emergency.
  • Pick two meeting places – one near your home and one outside your neighborhood in case you cannot return home after an emergency.
  • Keep family records in a water- and fireproof safe. Inexpensive models can be purchased at most hardware stores.

Watches and Warnings

 

Oklahomans are reminded that tornadoes can occur any time of year. Knowing the difference between watches and warnings can help save lives. 

 

A TORNADO WATCH means tornadoes are possible. 

 

A TORNADO WARNING means a tornado has been sighted. 

 

When a TORNADO WARNING is issued, take shelter in a basement, away from windows. If there is no basement, go to an interior room, like a closet, on the ground floor. 

 

Prepare a Disaster Supply Kit

 

Electricity, water, heat, air conditioning or telephone service may not work in an emergency. Preparing disaster supply kits in advance can save precious time in the event you must evacuate or go without utilities for an extended period.
 

Store items for a “go” kit in an easy-to-carry bag and keep in a car or in the garage. The “home” kit can be stored in a plastic tub or garbage can and kept in your home’s safest place where you will take shelter.
 

Consider including the following items when putting together your disaster supply kit:

  • At least a 3-day supply of water (1 gallon per person per day). Store water in sealed, unbreakable containers. Replace every 6 months.
  • A 3- to 5-day supply of nonperishable packaged or canned food and a non-electric can opener.
  • A change of clothing, rain gear and sturdy shoes.
  • Blankets, bedding or sleeping bags.
  • A first aid kit and prescription medications (be sure to check expiration dates).
  • An extra pair of glasses or contact lenses and solution.
  • Special items for infants, the elderly or family members with disabilities.
  • A battery-powered radio, a flashlight and extra batteries.

Identify Your Safest Place at Home, Work

 

Before an emergency strikes, take time to identify your safest place at home, at work and at school. Many people have survived strong tornadoes in a closet or small interior room without windows. Usually the safest place will be on the lowest floor. If you live in a mobile home, identify the nearest sturdy building – it may not be safe to remain in a mobile home during a storm.

At schools, offices and hospitals, preparedness plans are especially important due to the large number of people on hand and the large amount of glass at many sites. Know the safest place for you to shelter in place and make sure others know their assigned location as well. At shopping malls, indoor pools and gymnasiums, long spanning buildings are commonly found. These locations can be dangerous because the entire roof can been supported by the outside walls. If caught in such an open building, the restroom may be the best place to take shelter.

If possible, one of the best ways to prepare for survival in Tornado Alley states like Oklahoma is to build or install a SafeRoom in your home or workplace. Your local emergency manager or homebuilders association will have information about SafeRooms. Plan how to get to your safest place, and share the information with your family.

 

View this information as an infographic

 

After the Storm

Once severe weather has passed, be prepared for possible flooding to occur. Also, watch for downed power lines and never drive into high water.

Wildfires Awareness

Friday, 15 November, 2019

Wildfire with fire tornadoWILDFIRE AWARENESS:

Wildfires are often caused by human activity. High winds and dry conditions can set the stage for potentially severe fires. The greatest single cause is when burning debris is not properly contained and sparks or burning trash blow into the air. Oklahomans can help prevent fires if they:

 

•Be careful when pulling off a road or driving into a field. Hot catalytic converters can ignite vegetation.

•Avoid burning trash. Even a barrel covered with a screen can allow a spark to escape, igniting nearby vegetation.

•Do not use fireworks during holidays.

•If you smoke in your car, extinguish cigarettes in vehicle ashtrays. Never toss a cigarette out of a car window, and don’t put cigarettes out on the ground.

•Keep a fire extinguisher and water handy when working outdoors with equipment that gets hot, or involves sparks, such as welding equipment. Water down outdoor work areas in advance if possible.

If advised to evacuate, do so immediately. Choose a route away from the fire hazard and be alert to changes in the speed and direction of fire and smoke.

When weather conditions make wildfires more likely in your area, prepare by taking the following precautions:

•Keep firefighting tools handy, such as: ladder long enough to reach the roof, shovel, rake and buckets.

•Place connected garden hoses on all sides of the house for emergency use.

•Know all emergency exits from your house.

•Learn all routes leading out of your neighborhood.

 

As fires actually approach, take the following actions:

•Park your car facing the direction of escape.

•Shut off gas at the meter. Only a qualified professional can safely turn the gas back on.

•Turn off propane tanks.

•Place combustible patio furniture inside.

 

For more information about wildfire safety, visit the following websites:

Oklahoma Firewise

Oklahoma Forestry Services

Flooding Safety

Friday, 15 November, 2019

Roadway floodingFlooding

 

 

Description

Floods are the most common and widespread of all natural disasters - except fire. Floods can be slow or fast rising and generally develop over a period of days.

Flash floods usually result from intense storms dropping large amounts of rain within a brief period. Flash floods occur with little or no warning and can reach full peak in only a few minutes.

In the United States, an average of 100 people lose their lives in floods annually, with flood damage averaging more than $2 billion. The Midwest's "Great Flood of 1993" cost 48 lives and more than $12 billion. Flash floods are the #1 weather-related killer in the United States.

Flood Safety

Before the flood:

•Find out if you live in a flood-prone area.

•Plan and practice an evacuation route.

•Have disaster supplies on hand.

•Develop an emergency communications plan.

•Learn about the National Flood Insurance Program.

During the flood:

•Stay informed. Turn on a battery-operated radio or television to get the latest emergency information. Turn Around Dont Drown.gif

•If advised to evacuate, do so immediately.

•Avoid walking through floodwater. Water only six inches deep can sweep you off your feet if it is moving swiftly.

•Do not drive into a flooded street. Cars can be swept away by two feet of moving water or there may be unseen damage to the road. If you come to a flooded area turn around and go another way. Most flood-related deaths are caused by people driving through water.

•Watch out for fire hazards.

 

 

 

 

After the flood:

•Take care of yourself first.

•Dry out your home.

•Restore the utilities.

•Clean up.

•Rebuild and flood proof.

•Prepare for the next flood.

 

Protect yourself from the next flood with flood insurance, a flood response plan and community flood protection programs.

 

For more information:

•American Red Cross information on flood and flash flood safety.

•Oklahoma Floodplain Managers Association promotes sound floodplain management practices and the natural and cultural benefits of the floodplain.

•Are you ready? has terms and tips for what to do before, during and after a flood.

•National Flood Insurance Program, has information about the NFIP program.

•Floods...The Awesome Power

 

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Director

selfie 002.jpg - 10.26 KB 
Gary D. Curtis  
Emergency Management Director
101 S 11th St Rm 108
Duncan, Ok 73533
Phone: 1 580 255 3411
Cell Phone: 580.656.0075
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 

About Stephens County OK.com

Welcome to the official website of Stephens County Oklahoma. The Purpose of this site is to help connect the people of Stephens County with participating government offices as well as other local information. Please let us know if you have any questions.