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Be Prepared for the Holiday Season

Wednesday, 13 December, 2017

Individual and Community Preparedness eBrief

u s d h s f e m a

December 7, 2017

In this issue:

·         Celebrate Safely this Holiday Season

·         Stay Safe: Wildfires Can Happen Anywhere, Anytime

·         Is the “Invisible Killer” in Your Home?

·         Prepare to Apply for a Wildfire Community Preparedness Day Award

·         Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Webinar: Sharing Lessons Learned from Recent Disasters

·         Important Dates to Remember

 

 

Celebrate Safely this Holiday Season

Keep candles 12 inches from things that can burnEntertaining and celebrating with family and friends is what the holiday season is all about. 

 

This year, take some time to learn about potential fire hazards related to cooking, candles, decorations, electrical cords, and heating devices.

 

Keep your holiday parties safe with these https://www.usfa.fema.gov/prevention/outreach/holiday.html">U.S. Fire Administration (USFA) tips:

  • Test your smoke alarms and tell your guests about your https://www.usfa.fema.gov/prevention/outreach/escape.html">home fire escape plan.
  • Keep children and pets away from lit candles.
  • Keep matches and lighters up high in a locked cabinet.
  • Stay in the kitchen when cooking at high temperatures like frying, grilling or broiling.
  • Ask people who smoke to smoke outside. Remind smokers to keep their smoking materials with them, so young children do not touch them.
  • Keep doorways and exit paths clear of furniture and decorations.

 

Find more holiday and fire safety information on the USFA https://www.usfa.fema.gov/prevention/outreach/holiday.html">Holiday Safety page.

 

   

 

Stay Safe: Wildfires Can Happen Anywhere, Anytime

Wildfire Graphichttps://www.fema.gov/blog/2017-12-06/southern-california-fire-update">With several active wildfires affecting the Western United States, it is important to know how to stay safe with information and resources from Prepareathon™.

 

Wildfires can happen anywhere in the country and at any time of year. If you see a wildfire approaching, call 911 to report the fire. Do not assume that someone else reported it and follow these tips from https://community.fema.gov/hazard/wildfire-en_us/be-smart?lang=en_US">Prepareathon’s How to Prepare for a Wildfire Guide:

 

If ordered to evacuate:

  • Leave immediately.
  • Help firefighters, if there is time before you leave. Some of the things to help include closing up the house and leaving lights on for visibility, as well as moving flammable materials to the center of the home, away from windows. You can also leave hoses connected to a water source, so they are available for the fire department.
  • Text SHELTER and your ZIP code (e.g., SHELTER 20472) to 43362 (4FEMA) to find the nearest shelter in your area. Follow local media for more information on shelters.

 

If trapped in your home:

  • Call 9-1-1 and provide your location, if possible. Please be aware that during a major event such as a wildfire, emergency services may be overwhelmed, and a response may be delayed or impossible.
  • Turn on the lights to increase the visibility of your home in heavy smoke.
  • Keep doors, windows, vents, and fire screens closed.
  • Keep your doors unlocked.
  • Move flammable materials (e.g., curtains, furniture) away from windows and sliding glass doors.
  • Fill sinks and tubs with water to assist in dousing small smoldering fires, which may pop up.
  • Stay inside, away from outside walls and windows.

 

For more information on wildfire safety, review https://community.fema.gov/hazard/wildfire-en_us/be-smart?lang=en_US">Prepareathon’s How to Prepare for a Wildfire guide, or watch the https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tWhTdfHQWqs">When the Fire Starts video. You can also read about https://www.buzzfeed.com/briannasacks/as-wildfires-rip-through-southern-california-heres-how?utm_term=.cpQJAbw3zE#.ip6JGjEywg">California’s use of FEMA’s Wireless Emergency Alerts during the recent wildfires.  

 

 

 

 

Is the “Invisible Killer” in Your Home?

Install and test carbon monoxide alarms at least once a month.Carbon monoxide (CO) is the “invisible killer” because it is a colorless, odorless, and poisonous gas.

 

According to the https://www.usfa.fema.gov/prevention/outreach/carbon_monoxide.html">U.S. Fire Administration (USFA), more than 150 people in the United States die every year from accidental nonfire-related CO poisoning from household products, like generators. Other products include faulty, improperly-used or incorrectly-vented, fuel-burning appliances such as furnaces, stoves, water heaters, and fireplaces.

 

Breathe easy this winter and avoid CO poisoning with these USFA tips:

  • Install and maintain CO alarms in a central location outside each separate sleeping area and on every level of your home to provide an early warning of CO.
  • Use portable generators outdoors in well-ventilated areas away from all doors, windows, and vents.
  • Make sure vents for the dryer, furnace, stove, and fireplace are clear of snow and other debris.

 

Learn the symptoms of CO poisoning and other CO safety information on the USFA https://www.usfa.fema.gov/prevention/outreach/carbon_monoxide.html">Carbon Monoxide Safety page.

 

   

 

Prepare to Apply for a Wildfire Community Preparedness Day Award

Wildfire Community Preparedness Day, Saturday, May 5, 2018Strengthen your wildfire preparedness by participating in https://community.nfpa.org/external-link.jspa?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nfpa.org%2FPublic-Education%2FCampaigns%2FNational-Wildfire-Community-Preparedness-Day">next year’s Wildfire Community Preparedness Day on May 5, 2018.  

 

This opportunity encourages communities to work together to address their wildfire risk.

 

Develop a plan now to collaborate with agency partners and identify the risks to your community. The https://community.nfpa.org/external-link.jspa?url=http%3A%2F%2Ffirewise.org%2F%3Fsso%3D0">National Fire Protection Association’s Firewise USA site has resources you can use to understand what your risks are in the home ignition zone.

 

Create your plan and get ready to apply next year from January 8 through March 2, 2018, for one of 150 funding awards. Participate on this day to be a part of helping to create safer, more resilient communities across the Nation.

 

On Wednesday, December 13, the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s Individual and Community Preparedness Division invites you to a webinar featuring several Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) programs from Florida, Texas and California to share their experiences and lessons learned from responding to the recent disasters. This webinar will also provide you with an opportunity to ask questions and share your knowledge.Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Webinar: Sharing Lessons Learned from Recent Disasters


Title:
https://icpd.adobeconnect.com/certlessons1/event/registration.html">CERT Webinar: Sharing Lessons Learned from Recent Disasters
 
Date: Wednesday, December 13, 2017
 
Time:  3:00 – 4:30 p.m. EDT
 
Speakers:

  • James Cunningham, North Collier Fire Rescue, Florida
  • Christy Rojas, CERT Program Manager, Volunteer Florida
  • John Ignatcyzk and Christopher Winn, Los Angeles City Fire Department, California
  • Jake Heflin, Long Beach City Fire, California
  • Lisa Rubey, New Braunfels CERT, Texas
  • Doris Hermann, Galveston County CERT, Texas


How to Join the Webinar:


We hope you will be able to join us on December 13!


December 13 at 3 p.m. ET: https://icpd.adobeconnect.com/certlessons1/event/registration.html">CERT Webinar - Sharing Lessons Learned from Recent DisastersImportant Dates to Remember


Disclaimer: The reader recognizes that the federal government provides links and informational data on various disaster preparedness resources and events and does not endorse any non-federal events, entities, organizations, services, or products. Please let us know about other events and services for individual and community preparedness that could be included in future newslettersby contacting This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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u s d h s f e m a

 

 

BEFORE AN EMERGENCY STRIKES

Friday, 3 November, 2017

ema suppliesCreate an Emergency Plan

 

Steps to take in creating a household emergency plan include:

 

  • Schedule a family meeting to discuss the dangers of possible emergency events including fire, severe weather, hazardous spills and terrorism.
  • Discuss how you and your family will respond to each possible emergency.
  • Discuss what to do in case of power outages or personal injuries.
  • Draw a floor plan of your home and mark two escape routes from each room.
  • Because it is often easier to call long distance during an emergency than within the affected area, choose an out-of-state friend or relative whom all family members will call if separated during an emergency.
  • Pick two meeting places – one near your home and one outside your neighborhood in case you cannot return home after an emergency.
  • Keep family records in a water- and fireproof safe. Inexpensive models can be purchased at most hardware stores.

Watches and Warnings

 

Oklahomans are reminded that tornadoes can occur any time of year. Knowing the difference between watches and warnings can help save lives. 

 

A TORNADO WATCH means tornadoes are possible. 

 

A TORNADO WARNING means a tornado has been sighted. 

 

When a TORNADO WARNING is issued, take shelter in a basement, away from windows. If there is no basement, go to an interior room, like a closet, on the ground floor. 

 

Prepare a Disaster Supply Kit

 

Electricity, water, heat, air conditioning or telephone service may not work in an emergency. Preparing disaster supply kits in advance can save precious time in the event you must evacuate or go without utilities for an extended period.
 

Store items for a “go” kit in an easy-to-carry bag and keep in a car or in the garage. The “home” kit can be stored in a plastic tub or garbage can and kept in your home’s safest place where you will take shelter.
 

Consider including the following items when putting together your disaster supply kit:

  • At least a 3-day supply of water (1 gallon per person per day). Store water in sealed, unbreakable containers. Replace every 6 months.
  • A 3- to 5-day supply of nonperishable packaged or canned food and a non-electric can opener.
  • A change of clothing, rain gear and sturdy shoes.
  • Blankets, bedding or sleeping bags.
  • A first aid kit and prescription medications (be sure to check expiration dates).
  • An extra pair of glasses or contact lenses and solution.
  • Special items for infants, the elderly or family members with disabilities.
  • A battery-powered radio, a flashlight and extra batteries.

Identify Your Safest Place at Home, Work

 

Before an emergency strikes, take time to identify your safest place at home, at work and at school. Many people have survived strong tornadoes in a closet or small interior room without windows. Usually the safest place will be on the lowest floor. If you live in a mobile home, identify the nearest sturdy building – it may not be safe to remain in a mobile home during a storm.

At schools, offices and hospitals, preparedness plans are especially important due to the large number of people on hand and the large amount of glass at many sites. Know the safest place for you to shelter in place and make sure others know their assigned location as well. At shopping malls, indoor pools and gymnasiums, long spanning buildings are commonly found. These locations can be dangerous because the entire roof can been supported by the outside walls. If caught in such an open building, the restroom may be the best place to take shelter.

If possible, one of the best ways to prepare for survival in Tornado Alley states like Oklahoma is to build or install a SafeRoom in your home or workplace. Your local emergency manager or homebuilders association will have information about SafeRooms. Plan how to get to your safest place, and share the information with your family.

 

View this information as an infographic

 

After the Storm

Once severe weather has passed, be prepared for possible flooding to occur. Also, watch for downed power lines and never drive into high water.

Tornado Safety

Friday, 3 November, 2017

Tornado in OklahomaTornadoes

Description

The tornado is the most violent storm on Earth. A tornado is a rapidly rotating column of air extending to the ground from a thunderstorm cloud. The path width of a tornado is usually very narrow, but can range up to a half-mile or more in the most extreme cases. Tornadoes usually only last a few minutes, but a few can last for much longer, traveling along the ground for several miles. Tornadoes can remain almost stationary, or can race across the countryside at speeds over 50 mph. Violent winds in and near the tornado can cause incredible destruction, and can generate flying debris, which is the main thing that hurts people in tornadoes.

Tornado Safety

Keeping informed about the weather is the best way to avoid being caught in a tornado or severe thunderstorm. Your local National Weather Service Forecast Office provides information about dangerous weather in your area, and you should keep a close eye on this information whenever storms threaten your area. A battery operated NOAA Weather Radio with a warning alarm feature should be a part of your information system!

It’s also critical that you think about tornado safety long before there’s a storm on the horizon, and plan what you will do to stay safe no matter where you may be when storms threaten.

When a severe storm or tornado threatens, remember these basic guidelines:

GET IN - get as far inside a strong building as you can, away from doors and windows

GET DOWN - get to the lowest floor

COVER UP - use whatever you can to protect yourself from flying or falling debris

•A reinforced underground storm shelter, storm cellar, enclosed basement or safe room are usually the safest places in a tornado. Underground shelters get you out of the way of flying and falling debris, which is a tornado’s most lethal weapon.

•If you cannot get underground, remember the basic guidelines. Get as far inside the strongest building you can find. Stay away from doors, windows and other openings to the outside. Put as many walls between you and the outside as you can.

•Get as low as you can. Go to the lowest floor of the building you’re in.

•Cover up to protect yourself from flying and falling debris. Use whatever you can find - pillows, blankets, sleeping bags, mattresses. Wearing a helmet or hardhat will help protect your head from debris.

•Being outdoors, in a mobile home, or in a vehicle are all unsafe in a tornado or severe thunderstorm. Find stronger shelter before the storm arrives and remember to get in, get down and cover up.

 

 

More information

•Tornado Project Online has a wealth of tornado information as well as with tornado myths, tornado oddities, personal experiences, tornado chasing and tornado safety.

•FEMA Are You Ready? has terms and tips for what to do before and during a tornado and preparing a safe room.

•American Red Cross: Tornado suggests how to prepare a home tornado plan, assemble a disaster supplies kit and what to do before, during and after a tornado.

•Historical information on Oklahoma tornadoes.

•Frequently Asked Questions about Tornadoes.

•FEMA tornado site for kids.

•Preparing a Safe Room has guidelines and instructions for building a safe room.

 

Registering Your Storm Shelter

Friday, 3 November, 2017

shelterIn the event of a severe weather disaster, pre-registration of your storm shelter enables rescue personnel to locate your shelter more efficiently. The information you provide will be mapped on Google Earth and used to locate your shelter so that rescue personnel can check on your well-being and secure your safety in the event that your shelter's exit should become blocked by fallen debris.  

Storm Shelters

Friday, 3 November, 2017

PhotoTornadoDamage1We continually strive to raise public awareness on severe weather safety and emergency preparedness. Thank you for being proactive and taking the initiative to determine a plan.  
Over the past several years, the majority of fatalities suffered due to severe storms, have been the result of people leaving their homes to seek shelter elsewhere. We encourage the public to "shelter in place" during severe weather...

Services - Emergency Management

Friday, 3 November, 2017

This program has been developed to provide a comprehensive emergency management process for Duncan and Stephens County. It seeks to mitigate the effects of hazards, prepare for measures to be taken which will preserve life and minimize damage, enhance response during emergencies and provide necessary assistance, and establish a recovery system in order to return the county to it's normal state of affairs.

CERT - Stephens County Emergency Management.

C.E.R.T.(Community Emergency Response Team)

The CERT Program was created to spearhead the effort to harness the power of every individual through training, education, and volunteer service to make a community safer, stronger, and better prepared to respond to disasters.

 

LEPC - Stephens County Emergency Management

LEPC(Local Emergency Planning Committee)

Friday, November 3, 2017 10:00 A.M. 

Materials Response Plan, Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS), and/or any chemical inventory lists, and follow-up emergency planning notices are available for public review at Stephens County Courthouse in room 107, consistent with Section 322 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act of 1986. The public may view these documents at the LEPC office during normal office hours from 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. If unavailable or if it's after office hours contact 911. 

Public Request for Information. Any person or institution may submit a written request for inormation under Section 311, 312, and 324 of the Emergency Planing and Community Right-To-Know Act of 1986 and the LEPC Manual. The LEPC Chairman shall serve as Coordinator of Information. Written request for Tier II inventory information may also be submitted to the LEPC. The LEPC shall provide the information from its files or when necesary, obtain the information from the company concerned. 

The location of specific chemicals identified on the Tier II reports may be withheld upon request of the facility owner or operator. All requests for and release of infromation will be reviewed by the Coordinator of Information, should such information be limited because of Homeland Security. 

Public Comment. Public comment concerning Hazardous Materials Response Plan or LEPC activities in general are welcomed. The hazardous Materials Response Plan will be open to discussion at every LEPC meeting. Comments or question directed to the LEPC will be answered as soon as possible, but not later than 45 working days, by the coordinator of Information. 

Distribution of the Hazardous Materials Response Plan. Routine distribution of the Plan will be available for public review in the LEPC office during normal office hours, or at the office of the Stephens County Information Coordinator and found within the Stephens County Emergency Operations Plan. 

 

 

 

Emergency Management

Friday, 3 November, 2017

Stephens County Emergency Management Stephens County Emergency Management strives to protect the lives and property of all the citizens of Stephens County.

More

Director

gary ballGary Ball
Emergency Management Director.
+1 580 255 3411
 
 

About Stephens County OK.com

Welcome to the official website of Stephens County Oklahoma. The Purpose of this site is to help connect the people of Stephens County with participating government offices as well as other local information. Please let us know if you have any questions.